What this county REALLY needs--FAST Internet!

Western North Carolina specific topics.

What this county REALLY needs--FAST Internet!

Postby author » Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:09 am

SPEED! SPEED! But we've come a long way, baby! Up here in these high hills.

In 1978 (right here in the Western North Carolina mountains), when I first started surfing ArpaNet (later to become the Internet), I used a 190-baud (190 characters per second) acoustic-coupled modem (you laid the phone down on top of it).

In the early eighties I got, in slow but reasonable succession, a 300 baud... then a 1200 baud... then a 2400 baud modem! In most of the old Delphi network days in the late eighties--when I was active on the SF and Writers Group forums (the latter of which I managed for seven years), I used mostly the 2400 baud dial-up modem.

In 1989--after I finally hit with a bestseller and got my first BIG royalty check (how big? I bought a new Volvo and paid cash, as well as a laser printer, new computer, etc. ). Part of the computer equipment (since I was now playing with Xenix, a type of Unix and forerunner of Linux) I got a 9600 baud modem! MAN! It was faaaaaaast!!! Could things get better?

Alas, they did not really quickly. Get better. I molassed along during the 90s with 2400 baud on Windows. By 2002--with new technologies like DSL now hitting even up here in the mountains, I decided it was time for more SPEED.

"You're seven miles from the nearest phone switching station... and DSL has a two mile limit. No DSL for you," the phone company said. Well, dang it, I WANTED DSL, so I figured a way to get it! From March of 2002, I had 750K up AND down (asymmetrical or ASDL). ... so for three years, I struggled along with a mere 750,000 bits per second, occasionally sneering at my old 190 baud modem, which I still have.

Last year, even that was not enough. SO--my Internet business justifying it now--I had a T1 line put in. That's 1.5 MILLION bits per second. Up AND down. ... I thought that would make me happy but NO ... Today the Skyrunner folks came and put me in a wireless link up to a nearby mountaintop and down to the Internet at over 6 mb!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Up AND down!!!!!!!!!

SPEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It's nice.

And they say I may hit 8mb when everything gets optimized.

Now? what?s this about the new burst technology I?ve been reading about? MORE speed on the horizon.
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Postby admin » Fri Jun 16, 2006 10:31 am

Very nice. Fixed wireless technology is a good thing. What type of transceiver did they install? I ran a wireless ISP a few years ago, and had a lot of fun doing it. If the FCC would further deregulate the ISM bands, we'd see even more of this technology being employed, and at lower costs.
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Postby author » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:06 am

admin wrote:Very nice. Fixed wireless technology is a good thing. What type of transceiver did they install? I ran a wireless ISP a few years ago, and had a lot of fun doing it. If the FCC would further deregulate the ISM bands, we'd see even more of this technology being employed, and at lower costs.


Not sure of the transceiver brand... it's all self-contained in a small, square box on the side of the building, antenna and all. They bounce it up to Spivey and down to Asheville. Works NICELY.

:)
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Postby Yellow_Dog » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:51 am

I also started at 300 baud, just slightly faster than I can type 8) Made the same progressions through 1200, 2400, and the big leap to 9600. Broadband finally came to Asheville and I was a beta tester for cable, which at that time was @home on what ever the cable company here was. Originally it was 512K/128K. All the doomsayers were saying "yea but wait until more get on and it will slow waaaaaaaaaaay down". Still on cable, now 3M/256K and I'm happy.

I don't need the speed on the up side as I'm not hosting and as a residential customer port 80 is blocked anyway. I can't even justify the extra cost to go to the 5Mb service they offer. I can download a DVD in a couple of hours now, and still surf, email, and my server is still updating my weather page, WeatherUnderground, and others. whats the rush? After all you gotta keep the wires warm :lol:

I installed 1200 and bleeding edge 1800 baud for customers in the late 70's on dedicated 2-pair phone lines.

What really rips me is how controlled it is in the US. Broadband into homes in South Korea is 50Mb, and 11Mb in Japan for less than we pay here.
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Postby admin » Fri Jun 16, 2006 2:23 pm

My first Internet connection was through a 56k modem. I thought THAT was slow! Currently I have a 3M/768K ADSL connection. There are faster options available, but it's more than enough download speed, and adequate upload speed. What's more important to me is the reliability. When I had a cable modem, the service would routinely go down for hours or even days at a time. I also used to have an SDSL line coming in here. It was extremely reliable, and I had a contact that allowed me to resell bandwidth and run webservers. I only got rid of it because it became more economical to switch over to ADSL and rent server space in a collocation center.
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Postby Thomas » Fri Jun 16, 2006 5:42 pm

This little faxct ought to slow your modem down some. :lol:


Your member of Congress, Rep. Taylor, voted against the free and open Internet. The fight now moves to the Senate.

Please call Rep. Taylor today to express your outrage?and call your Senators in support of Net Neutrality?


Congressman Charles Taylor
Phone: 202-225-6401

Senator Elizabeth Dole
Phone: 202-224-6342

Senator Richard Burr
Phone: 202-224-3154
"You teach best what you most need to learn." ~ Richard Bach
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Postby admin » Fri Jun 16, 2006 6:07 pm

That's ambiguous. Can you elaborate?
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Postby 4tees » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:23 pm

author wrote:
admin wrote:Very nice. Fixed wireless technology is a good thing. What type of transceiver did they install? I ran a wireless ISP a few years ago, and had a lot of fun doing it. If the FCC would further deregulate the ISM bands, we'd see even more of this technology being employed, and at lower costs.


Not sure of the transceiver brand... it's all self-contained in a small, square box on the side of the building, antenna and all. They bounce it up to Spivey and down to Asheville. Works NICELY.

:)


It is encouraging that we may be able to get fast internet in our neck of the woods. Thanks for the info Author.
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Postby author » Sat Jun 17, 2006 5:41 am

4tees wrote:
author wrote:
admin wrote:Very nice. Fixed wireless technology is a good thing. What type of transceiver did they install? I ran a wireless ISP a few years ago, and had a lot of fun doing it. If the FCC would further deregulate the ISM bands, we'd see even more of this technology being employed, and at lower costs.


Not sure of the transceiver brand... it's all self-contained in a small, square box on the side of the building, antenna and all. They bounce it up to Spivey and down to Asheville. Works NICELY.

:)


It is encouraging that we may be able to get fast internet in our neck of the woods. Thanks for the info Author.


For individuals, BellSouth offers cheap but fast DSL over most of the county now I think. And Charter provides fast access also via cable. If you're REALLY out in the boondocks, there are several satellite services and the wireless service I describe above (a bit pricey but fantastic) if you are line of sight to one of their mountaintop repeaters.

:)
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