Brain sensor helps paralyzed people do tasks

Brain sensor helps paralyzed people do tasks

Postby admin » Fri Jul 14, 2006 1:18 am

This looks like very promising news.

Brain sensor helps paralyzed people do tasks

By Dan Vergano, USA TODAY
A brain implant makes it possible for paralyzed patients to move a robotic arm and a computer cursor with some ease, says a study released Thursday.

The report published in the journal Nature comes amid intense efforts by neuroprosthetics researchers to give paralyzed patients more normal lives.

A second journal study involving two monkeys suggests such implants may allow paralyzed people to type the equivalent of 15 words a minute.

Brain implants "are really a launching pad for a whole new kind of neurotechnology," says John Donoghue of Brown University in Providence, co-author of the first study. He and colleagues report that an implant enabled a 25-year-old paralyzed man to squeeze a robotic hand and use a robotic arm to move objects and a computer cursor.

Unlike efforts that employ non-invasive scalp readings of brain activity, researchers surgically attached a rigid 100-electrode sensor, about the size of a pencil eraser tip, atop the motor-control region of the paralyzed patient's brain.

The sensor read the firing of brain cells when the patient thought about moving his arms or hands.


http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/di ... OE=TECISVA
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 779
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 5:10 pm
Location: North Georgia Mountains

Postby MurphyMobile » Fri Jul 14, 2006 9:57 pm

This article reminds me of Stephen Hawking, who has Lou Gehrig's disease or ALS.
He gradually lost the use of his arms, legs, and voice, and is now almost completely paralysed. The computer system attached to his wheelchair is operated by Hawking via an infra-red 'blink switch' clipped onto his glasses. By scrunching his right cheek up, he is able to talk, compose speeches, research papers, browse the World Wide Web and write e-mail. The system also uses radio transmission to provide control over doors in his home and office.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hawking#Illness

I can hardly understand his books and papers. But I found it fascinating
over the years how he learned to communicate with his family, friends,
and the world through computer assistance.

It would be great to say it is a good thing with this Brain Sensor, but I
would hope the individual that could use it would WANT it before anyone
else makes that decision for him/her.

Joni Eareckson Tada
http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/programmes/songsofpraise/features/joni_eareckson_tada/
Jill Kinmont Boothe
http://www.jkbs.org/aboutjill.htm
The two women above have not only survived their injuries causing them
to be quadriplegics but they have learned to adjust to the world of
"normal folks" in which they fought to change things. And they both
learned to paint using a brush in their mouth to provide an outlet and
a way to pay for their wants and or needs.

This happened before computers were discussed for medical purposes,
especially the brain sensor.

http://www.mattieonline.com/about.htm
Mattie J. T. Stepanek, had Dysautonomic Mitochondrial Myopathy, a rare
for of muscular dystrophy. He wrote poetry books and went on various
TV shows to talk about his disease. He passed away at the age of 13 in
Washington DC area. His website tells a lot about him, but his books and
interviews (one with Larry King were awesome).

I do not think any computerized equipment could help him. There is still
much research for Muscular Dystrophy. His mother, Jennie, has MD. He
also had a brother that preceded him in death due to the disease.

Whether computers, brain sensors, muscle sensors or other medical
equipment will help MD patients is unknown. But to read about Mattie
and his books he wrote is amazing.
Image
User avatar
MurphyMobile
 
Posts: 1196
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:30 pm
Location: Asheville, NC

Postby admin » Fri Jul 14, 2006 11:56 pm

When I was learning American Sign Language, I met a woman who had what's called a Cochlear Implant in one of her ears. These are electronic, artificial ears that interface directly with the brain. She was almost completely deaf for years before the device was installed. Traditional hearing aids helped her make out loud noises, but weren't enough to understand words or fully enjoy music.

We were able to carry on a conversation without much difficulty, speaking at normal voice levels. I thought it was incredible. Let's put it this way - she was a lot better at spoken English than I was at ASL.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 779
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 5:10 pm
Location: North Georgia Mountains

Re: Brain sensor helps paralyzed people do tasks

Postby Thomas » Mon Dec 21, 2009 1:38 pm

Who cares? :mrgreen:

This phone has served me well for over 50 years now, don't need one of those newfangled gadgets. Image
"You teach best what you most need to learn." ~ Richard Bach
User avatar
Thomas
 
Posts: 1055
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 6:26 am
Location: Fletcher, NC

Re:

Postby MurphyMobile » Mon Dec 28, 2009 6:46 am

admin wrote:When I was learning American Sign Language, I met a woman who had what's called a Cochlear Implant in one of her ears. These are electronic, artificial ears that interface directly with the brain. She was almost completely deaf for years before the device was installed. Traditional hearing aids helped her make out loud noises, but weren't enough to understand words or fully enjoy music.

We were able to carry on a conversation without much difficulty, speaking at normal voice levels. I thought it was incredible. Let's put it this way - she was a lot better at spoken English than I was at ASL.


Hey admin,

Just saw this post.

My dentist has a dental assistant that has has had that or something extremely similar. She was born deaf.
When I first met her at the office she still talked different. Now she has excellent speech. And I do not dare
whisper to my dentist when she is in the lab. :lol:

Watch out with this girl, she probably reads lips.

MM 8)
Image
User avatar
MurphyMobile
 
Posts: 1196
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:30 pm
Location: Asheville, NC

Re: Brain sensor helps paralyzed people do tasks

Postby etowah » Sat Jan 23, 2010 8:57 pm

All of these medical advances made possible by a for profit health care system!!
He who keeps on dropping the ball doesn't
want to be in the game.
etowah
 
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 9:15 pm
Location: Florida

Re: Brain sensor helps paralyzed people do tasks

Postby 4tees » Sun Jan 24, 2010 1:32 pm

etowah wrote:All of these medical advances made possible by a for profit health care system!!


Strange that we are slowly loosing our once seemingly insurmountable lead in the medical industry to those nations in the world with socialized medicine (as we have lost the lead in virtually every other technological category)? Perhaps they have found a better balance between individual reward and social responsibility? As they once learned from us, perhaps it is time we learned from them?

OOPS, I forgot, we here in the US are perfect in every way and have nothing to learn from anyone else in the world :roll:
Don't be a sheeple
User avatar
4tees
 
Posts: 841
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:17 pm
Location: 3250 ft in Beautiful WNC


Return to Health and Fitness

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron